Ages 3 to 5

Introduction to Our ECE Program

 

 

“I think I’m right!”

 

 

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Developmental Milestones ages 3 to 5. See what child development skills that your child will master between these ages.

Image result for the first five years gates

Welcome to the Early Years Teaching Program

Message from U-Can Director

I am convinced that we can make school an enjoyable adventure.
Young children live in a world that is magical and full of adventure. Their imagination runs wild and almost everything they do is filled with fun and wonder. Learning is easy – something new and exciting is on the horizon of each new day.

 

Botanical Gardens Treasure Hunt

It is so refreshing to watch the ease with which small children develop their mental capacities. They are afraid of nothing; when they stumble they just get up and try again. Everything has to be seen, heard, touched and tasted. Their world is a wonderful adventure.

Practice Writing on the Slate

 

Our Vision
“To make learning such an enjoyable adventure that it becomes an exciting lifelong quest.”

 

Early Years Class at the Zoo

 

Foundations starting Age 5 - Preparing for Grade 1

KidSmart Prepares Your Child for Grade 1

KidSmart Teaches children to:

  • make reasoned decisions
  • solve problems
  • develop thinking processes
  • learn to communicate effectively
  • understand how to work and cooperate with others
  • develop a positive mindset towards learning
  • build a positive sense of self.

What is KidSmart?

A specially designed curriculum for your child to get him/her ready for Grade 1 in primary school.

The KidSmart early learning program lays a solid foundation for primary education.

KidSmart is a fun adventure in learning.

KidSmart gets your child excited about learning. School becomes a special place that is new and enjoyable  every day.

  1. English Smart Activity Fun Book
    • These appealing Activity Fun books provide children with fun-to-do activities to stimulate their interest in learning simple language concepts and skills
  2. ReadSmart
    • ReadSmart aims at cultivating young learners’ interest in reading and developing their reading skills.
    • The short stories, with captivating and colourful illustrations, form the basis for fun and engaging activities that young learners enjoy doing.
  3. Reading Basics
    • Use First-Rate Reading Basics: Phonemic Awareness and Phonics to produce first-rate readers with fun, interactive, and original activities that emphasize reading skills for grades K–1.
    • These skills include blending, segmentation, syllables, letter identification, consonant sounds, long and short vowel sounds, and consonant blends and digraphs. This 80-page book includes a reproducible parent letter and student assessments.
  4. Children Around the World
    • Takes students in Foundations on a field trip without leaving the classroom using Children Around the World:
    • This 160-page book includes cross-curricular activities that foster social and cultural awareness through:
      • reading, writing, math
      • large and small motor activities
      • science experiments, art projects
      • dramatic play and cooking
    • Students learn to:
      • keep journals
      • collect pictures and postcards
  5. MathSmart-to-Go
    • The Smart-to-Go board book collection is your child’s first learning companion.
    • It introduces your child to Math in a fun, playful way.
    • Your child will enjoy learning numbers, printing, and counting through the wipe-clean games and activities
  6. MathSmart Activity Fun Book
    • These appealing Activity Fun books provide children with fun-to-do activities to stimulate their interest in learning simple math concepts and skills.
  7. The Smart Early Learning Series
    • The Smart Early Learning series is developed specifically for preschool to Grade 2 children.
    • The 16 titles in the Smart Early Learning series not only cover all the essentials that young children should learn but also provide them with fun and simple activities to arouse their interest in learning.
  8. KidSmart Hands On
    • The Thinking Kids’® Math 7″ Geoboards are perfect way to bring hands-on learning in the classroom.
    • Teach geometric concepts with these double sided, 7″ geoboards.
    • Each board features 25 pins on one side and a 12 pin circular array on the opposite side for your students to discover shapes, angles, measurement, area and perimeter.
    • Set includes 10 brightly colored boards and 120 rubber bands in 5 colors.

What is Foundations?

It is a specially designed program that prepares your child for Grade 1.

Why is it called Foundations?

Your child needs a proper introduction before entering primary school. This  program lays the foundation for successful entry into Grade 1. Foundations sets the stage for an enjoyable educational experience.’

Is this a new concept in education?

Not really. Professional educators have long realized that a proper foundation is very important if a child is to do well in school. We have just put an extra emphasis on this part of your child’s development because we want to ensure that at U-Can International Primary School your child will be given the best start possible.

What curriculum do you use for Foundations?

We use the KidSmart curriculum developed in Canada by a team of professional educators. The KidSmart program is the introduction to the integrated Smart Curriculum we use for Primary School.

What does the research tell us about effective programs for young children?

  • Use play-based and inquiry-based learning and teaching.
  • Involve children in active, multi-sensory learning experiences.
  • Involve children in collaborative learning.
  • Develop self-management skills and independence.
  • Develop early literacy and numeracy understandings.
  • Develop children’s positive dispositions to themselves and learning.
  • Monitor children’s learning.
  • Provide continuity between settings.

The KidSmart Foundations Learning Environment

  • large open classroom space with plenty of room for activities
  • the classroom is colourful and imaginatively decorated
  • a large variety of learning toys and visual aids to enhance comprehension.
  • an outdoor learning area with places to climb, crawl and explore.
  • singing, dancing, art, crafts, cooking activities, swimming pool
  • caring and creative teachers who enjoy teaching small children
  • a family atmosphere with older students being big brothers and sisters

You child will develop the following attributes:

  • social and emotional competence
  • health and physical well-being
  • language and  communication skills
  • early mathematical understandings
  • active learning processes
  • positive disposition to learning.

The following are the objectives for the academic year that the daily, weekly and monthly lesson plans are based on.  Regular staff meetings are held during the year to discuss if the objectives are being met and changes to the lesson plans are implemented if necessary. Discussions are also held to develop alternative activities and strategies if any individual falls outside the normal range of development during the year. The objectives are subdivided into three areas, cognitive, social and motor skill development.

Cognitive Development

  • The child demonstrates the ability to write their first and last name in print, using correct technique in letter formation and without aids such as highlighters, or their name printed out for them to copy from.
  • The child is able to recite his or her own address and telephone number.
  • The child can correctly identify all of the letters in the alphabet in print (shown non-sequentially).
  • Correctly identify at least seven shapes.
  • Correctly identify at least ten colors
  • Recite in correct sequence the numbers one to fifty
  • Demonstrate the ability to count up to and down from twelve and understand the concepts of subsets, addition and subtraction of single objects from the total.
  • Name the four seasons and identify at least two characteristics of each season.
  • Answer basic questions regarding the content of a story read to them demonstrating an understanding of the plot, characters and story line.
  • Demonstrate successfully the ability to follow multiple directions for task completion and perform the necessary prerequisites (such as writing their names at the top of the page and getting the necessary supplies) without direction.
  • Demonstrate the ability to place in the correct sequence routine events depicted in four picture story lines.
  • Show the pre-literacy skills of sounding out words by letter, recognizing the first letter in a word by sound and utilizing the beginning principles of phonics.

The method for fostering the cognitive development of each child is through weekly thematic presentation of concepts, letters and numbers during project, skill enrichment and circle time. Each theme offers the opportunity to promote numeracy and literacy learning in a varied way to engage the child. Daily calendar, weather review, worksheets, computer time, number and alphabet flash cards and games offer the necessary repetition to foster cognitive development of basic skills.

The method for determining if the desired objectives have been achieved is through tests using flash cards and student/teacher interviews. A standard test is given at the beginning of the year and at the end of the school year to each student for comparison. Results are then presented to the child’s parent or guardian at end of year parent teacher conferences. Any irregularities in cognitive development are brought to the attention of the parents immediately.

Social Development

  • Demonstrate pro-social behavior including the ability to share, take turns, forgive, apologize and show consideration for others feelings.
  • Use good manners on a regular basis without prompting. The proper etiquette to include, saying please thank you, and excuse me.
  • To play cooperatively in both small group and large group activities, behavior should include; taking turns, sharing, participation in dialogue and the ability to participate during “free” play time with others beyond parallel play.
  • Demonstrate the foundations of the necessary skills to manage aggression, anger and frustration.

The method for promoting positive social development of the children in the class is through positive reinforcement of proper behavior, verbal reminders of good social behavior, teachers setting a good example of behavior and reading stories, doing activities and initiating discussions that touch on the concepts of pro-social behavior.

The method for testing if the objectives are being met is through observation of general class behavior and constructing situations that can be monitored to record the specific social interactions. Summaries as to each student’s social development are included in the final school report. Any irregularities in a child’s social development are brought to the attention of the parents immediately.

Fine and Gross Motor Skill Development

  • Perform fine motor skill activities with proper technique and accuracy including, using pencils, scissors, glue bottles, paint brushes and project materials
  • Demonstrate proficiency in using small manipulatives including counting beads and disks, threading cards, magnets, Lego and building blocks.
  • Use the computer mouse correctly to execute simple computer activities.
  • Perform gross motor skill activities including throwing and catching a soft rubber ball, jumping on two feet forward and backward, hoping, walking on a balance beam, skipping and galloping.
  • Demonstrate confidence in performing the basic gross and fine motor skills necessary in every day living.

The method for gross motor skill development is through both structured physical activities and unstructured playtime in the gym and playground. The method for fine motor skill development is through performance of a variety of projects in the daily curriculum that utilize materials including scissors, paint, glue pencils and crayons. During directed class time play, a variety of small manipulatives are made available for the children to work with.

The method for testing is through collecting and comparing samples of work completed throughout the year. End of year worksheets and skill tests demonstrate the abilities and accuracy of the child in task performance. Any irregularities in gross or fine motor skill development are brought to the attention of the parents immediately.

By assessing each student at the beginning and end of year we are able to provide parents with detailed information regarding their child’s progress, areas of strengths and areas requiring further development. Detailed information is vital when making decisions pertaining to the child’s transition to kindergarten, the possible need for any early intervention and most importantly, insuring we are engaging and challenging each child so that they may develop to their full potential.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Behavioral & Social skills for Foundations

  • Demonstrates ability to sit quietly both alone and in a group setting to listen and participate in an activity.
  • Practices self-control, patience, and ability to accept delayed gratification.
  • Understands daily rules and procedures
  • Can identify and express emotions.
  • Is able to share feelings in a range of contexts and shows empathy towards others.
  • Attributes their own feelings and emotions to the internal and external circumstances of their day and life.
  • Works towards fulfilling expectations and completes tasks in a timely manner, sometimes without being asked.
  • Helps clean, tidy a space, and knows where items belong.
  • Practices self-care and maintenance tasks such as brushing teeth, combing hair, getting dressed, etc.
  • Interacts both verbally and non verbally such as through smiles, waving, and other appropriate gestures.
  • Understands capability, worth, individuality, and diversity among all people including themselves.
  • Recognizes personal space & polite behaviors – Shows competency in not interrupting and recognizing private conversations and when someone wishes to be left alone.
  • Socializes easily with others.
  • Demonstrates responsibility by completing tasks, keeping track of belongings, and keeping supplies in good repair.
  • Expresses emotions appropriately and in the right context.
  • Recognizes the need to help others, such as sharing
  • Offers encouraging comments to others & shows willingness to volunteer & serve.
  • Begins to employ conflict resolution skills to get along with others and can articulate needs and feelings in order to stand up for themselves when needed.
  • Works on developing calming strategies and employs them when needed.
    Recognizes safe/unsafe, appropriate/inappropriate, etc.

Logic & Reasoning for 5 year olds

  • Demonstrates critical thinking skills and problem solving, even in mild to moderately abstract contexts.
  • Can identify differences in two similar pictures.
  • Shows curiosity and motivation.
  • Understands and interprets symbolic language such as signs, objects, actions, and pictures to represent something else.
  • Shows persistence and accomplishes even challenging tasks, despite minor interruptions and distractions.
  • Looks at problems from multiple angles and shows flexibility in how they approach problems.
  • Uses basic observation skills to analyze objects.
  • Sequences according to shape, size, color, and pattern.
  • Graph similarities and differences on a Venn Diagram

Cognitive & Developmental Outcomes for Kindergartners

Arts & Social Sciences

  • Make controlled linear motions with a writing utensil and shows progress in formation of letters, numbers, and shapes.
  • Classifies geographical landforms and areas of water.
  • Studies the continents and understands climate diversity, relative locations, etc.
  • Analyzes why animals live where they do.
  • Recognizes a compass rose and understand basic directions such as left/right, up/ down, etc. as approaching understanding of cardinal directions.
  • Demonstrates an understanding of diversity among people, climates, and land.
  • Charts events on a time line.
  • Sings, claps, and shows involvement in music.

Language & Literacy Skills

  • Replicates and forms both upper and lower case letters.
  • Spells simple words by sounding out letters and letter combinations.
  • Identifies vowels vs. consonants.
  • Writes their own name with ease.
  • Can discriminate rhymes and similar phonemic sounds while reading or speaking
  • Demonstrates comprehension skills and can answer questions about books after being read.
  • Narrates extensive made-up stories that have a plot (whether verbally, with puppets, or by some other means).
  • Can select a picture of a certain letter and vice versa.
  • Develops basic reading skills.

Science Skills

  • Demonstrates problem solving and the use of tools to achieve a goal.
  • Studies the life cycle of multiple animals.
  • Compares the differences between living and non-living organisms.
  • Understands basic needs and life processes of plants and animals.
  • Analyzes the water cycle and can conclude how temperature affects water.
  • Demonstrates understanding of sink vs float.
  • Recognizes that gravity is a force that affects us, water, and everything on earth.
  • Identifies planets in the solar system and explores basic astronomy.
  • Charts changes in weather.
  • Understands the functions of the body and can identify the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, and digestive systems
  • Describes simple functions and basic parts of the body.
  • Makes observations and hypotheses & reports findings in journal or notebook.
  • Collects samples to analyze and observe.

Mathematical concepts for Foundations Level

  • Recognizes even “atypical” shapes such as upside-down, obtuse triangles, etc.
  • Interprets and completes patterns.
  • Recognizes multiple ways of writing and sharing numerical values such as through dots, Arabic numbers, roman numerals, etc..
  • Shows a basic understanding of money, its use, and its finite quantity.
  • Identifies quantity and value relating to money.
  • Can show a connection between written numbers and their quantities.
  • Recognizes what time it is and operates on a schedule.
  • Uses manipulatives in order to understand and analyze difficult mathematical questions.
  • Adds 2 and 3 1-digit numbers, two digit numbers, and 3 digit numbers.
  • Applies mathematical understanding through measurement and cooking.
  • Can skip count by 2s, 5s, and 10s.
  • Uses a number line to solve problems
  • Compares and orders numbers.
  • Charts with bar graphs and pie charts.
  • Solve number sentences.
  • Completes and answers mathematical word problems.
  • Measures with a ruler.
  • Learns the basic functions of a calculator and it’s use as a resource and tool, but only when needed.
  • Writes numbers to 100+
  • Compares heaviest, longest, shortest, etc.
  • Uses a calendar and understands linear and sequential order.

Physical Development & Health Education Skills

  • Cuts along a dotted line and shows coordination.
  • Holds a pencil, paint brush, marker, or other writing utensil correctly while writing, drawing, and creating.
  • Manipulates materials into recognizable objects such as play-doh, kinetic sand,
    paint, or clay into a snowman or other object.
    Can pedal and or maintain balance on a tricycle, bicycle or balance bike
  • Demonstrates dexterity and fine motor skills through lacing, threading, stacking, and drawing.
  • Can climb a ladder whether standing upright or flat on the ground.
  • Throws and catches a ball and/or frisbee.
  • Kicks and practices dribbling.
  • Understands the concept of base of support and center of gravity.
  • Move with awareness of others in general space.
  • Demonstrates a variety of the basic locomotor skills of walking, running, hopping, jumping, galloping, sliding, and skipping.
  • Demonstrates a variety of basic non-locomotor movements of bending, pushing, pulling, stretching, turning, twisting, swinging, swaying, rocking, balancing, and rolling.
  • Balances on a balance beam and on other objects and shows cross-body movement between right arm-left leg and vice versa.
  • Learns healthy food choices. Compares and contrasts healthy and unhealthy foods.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of flexibility through warm-up activities and perform exercises that enhance proper flexibility in a variety of muscle groups.
  • Relates scientific understanding of the bones such as bones and muscles to physical activity and health.
  • Enjoys participating in games and activities and recognizes the rules associated with playing.
  • Executes movements in a rhythmic fashion and dances to a beat.
  • Participate in TaeKwanDo activities.

Kindergarten starting Age 4

Kindergarten with Slates

Kindergarten – The Children’s Garden

In German the term literally means Children’s Garden. This is a very good description of the starting place of your child’s education.

What happens in kindergarten?

Kindergarten is a place where your child can explore the world around him/her in a safe and fun way.  It is a place where your child learns to interact and cooperate with others in order to develop the communication and social skills needed in school and  everyday living.

What are the main objectives of Kindergarten?

♦ To discover that leaning new things is fun.

♦ To arouse curiosity so that your child will want to “know”.

♦ To instill a positive self-worth so that your child feels good about himself/herself.

The Focus of Kindergarten is…

♦ knowing that learning is fun – school is special

♦ deciding for yourself

♦ solving problems & figuring things out

♦ being able to clearly share your thoughts

♦ getting along and working with others

♦ feeling good about who you are

♦ playing games indoors and outdoors

♦ participating in activities like singing, dancing, playing drums, acting, drawing and painting

♦ learning about letters, words and numbers

Kindergarten Curriculum

Our Explore and Discover Kindergarten curriculum creates a developmentally appropriate learning environment that empowers children to succeed in kindergarten and beyond by inspiring confident, successful, lifelong learners.

Expected Learning Outcomes

Behavioral & Social skills for Kindergarten

  • Demonstrates ability to sit quietly both alone and in a group setting to listen and participate in an activity.
  • Practices self-control, patience, and ability to accept delayed gratification.
  • Understands daily rules and procedures
  • Can identify and express emotions.
  • Is able to share feelings in a range of contexts and shows empathy towards others.
  • Attributes their own feelings and emotions to the internal and external circumstances of their day and life.
  • Works towards fulfilling expectations and completes tasks in a timely manner, sometimes without being asked.
  • Helps clean, tidy a space, and knows where items belong.
  • Practices self-care and maintenance tasks such as brushing teeth, combing hair, getting dressed, etc.
  • Interacts both verbally and non verbally such as through smiles, waving, and other appropriate gestures.
  • Understands capability, worth, individuality, and diversity among all people including themselves.
  • Recognizes personal space & polite behaviors – Shows competency in not interrupting and recognizing private conversations and when someone wishes to be left alone.
  • Socializes easily with others.
  • Demonstrates responsibility by completing tasks, keeping track of belongings, and keeping supplies in good repair.
  • Expresses emotions appropriately and in the right context.
  • Recognizes the need to help others, such as sharing
  • Offers encouraging comments to others & shows willingness to volunteer & serve.
  • Begins to employ conflict resolution skills to get along with others and can articulate needs and feelings in order to stand up for themselves when needed.
  • Works on developing calming strategies and employs them when needed.
    Recognizes safe/unsafe, appropriate/inappropriate, etc.

Logic & Reasoning for 4 & 5 year olds

  • Demonstrates critical thinking skills and problem solving, even in mild to moderately abstract contexts.
  • Can identify differences in two similar pictures.
  • Shows curiosity and motivation.
  • Understands and interprets symbolic language such as signs, objects, actions, and pictures to represent something else.
  • Shows persistence and accomplishes even challenging tasks, despite minor interruptions and distractions.
  • Looks at problems from multiple angles and shows flexibility in how they approach problems.
  • Uses basic observation skills to analyze objects.
  • Sequences according to shape, size, color, and pattern.
  • Graph similarities and differences on a Venn Diagram

Cognitive & Developmental Outcomes for Kindergartners

Arts & Social Sciences

  • Make controlled linear motions with a writing utensil and shows progress in formation of letters, numbers, and shapes.
  • Classifies geographical landforms and areas of water.
  • Studies the continents and understands climate diversity, relative locations, etc.
  • Analyzes why animals live where they do.
  • Recognizes a compass rose and understand basic directions such as left/right, up/ down, etc. as approaching understanding of cardinal directions.
  • Demonstrates an understanding of diversity among people, climates, and land.
  • Charts events on a time line.
  • Sings, claps, and shows involvement in music.

Language & Literacy Skills

  • Replicates and forms both upper and lower case letters.
  • Spells simple words by sounding out letters and letter combinations.
  • Identifies vowels vs. consonants.
  • Writes their own name with ease.
  • Can discriminate rhymes and similar phonemic sounds while reading or speaking
  • Demonstrates comprehension skills and can answer questions about books after being read.
  • Narrates extensive made-up stories that have a plot (whether verbally, with puppets, or by some other means).
  • Can select a picture of a certain letter and vice versa.

Science Skills

  • Demonstrates problem solving and the use of tools to achieve a goal.
  • Studies the life cycle of multiple animals.
  • Compares the differences between living and non-living organisms.
  • Understands basic needs and life processes of plants and animals.
  • Analyzes the water cycle and can conclude how temperature affects water.
  • Demonstrates understanding of sink vs float.
  • Recognizes that gravity is a force that affects us, water, and everything on earth.
  • Identifies planets in the solar system and explores basic astronomy.
  • Charts changes in weather.
  • Understands the functions of the body and can identify the skeletal, muscular, circulatory, and digestive systems
  • Describes simple functions and basic parts of the body.
  • Makes observations and hypotheses & reports findings in journal or notebook.
  • Collects samples to analyze and observe.

Mathematical concepts for kindergartners

  • Recognizes even “atypical” shapes such as upside-down, obtuse triangles, etc.
  • Interprets and completes patterns.
  • Recognizes multiple ways of writing and sharing numerical values such as through dots, Arabic numbers, roman numerals, etc..
  • Shows a basic understanding of money, its use, and its finite quantity.
  • Identifies quantity and value relating to money.
  • Can show a connection between written numbers and their quantities.
  • Recognizes what time it is and operates on a schedule.
  • Uses manipulatives in order to understand and analyze difficult mathematical questions.
  • Adds 2 and 3 1-digit numbers, two digit numbers, and 3 digit numbers.
  • Applies mathematical understanding through measurement and cooking.
  • Can skip count by 2s, 5s, and 10s.
  • Uses a number line to solve problems
  • Compares and orders numbers.
  • Charts with bar graphs and pie charts.
  • Solve number sentences.
  • Completes and answers mathematical word problems.
  • Measures with a ruler.
  • Learns the basic functions of a calculator and it’s use as a resource and tool, but only when needed.
  • Writes numbers to 100+
  • Compares heaviest, longest, shortest, etc.
  • Uses a calendar and understands linear and sequential order.

Physical Development & Health Education Skills

  • Cuts along a dotted line and shows coordination.
  • Holds a pencil, paint brush, marker, or other writing utensil correctly while writing, drawing, and creating.
  • Manipulates materials into recognizable objects such as play-doh, kinetic sand,
    paint, or clay into a snowman or other object.
    Can pedal and or maintain balance on a tricycle, bicycle or balance bike
  • Demonstrates dexterity and fine motor skills through lacing, threading, stacking, and drawing.
  • Can climb a ladder whether standing upright or flat on the ground.
  • Throws and catches a ball and/or frisbee.
  • Kicks and practices dribbling.
  • Understands the concept of base of support and center of gravity.
  • Move with awareness of others in general space.
  • Demonstrates a variety of the basic locomotor skills of walking, running, hopping, jumping, galloping, sliding, and skipping.
  • Demonstrates a variety of basic non-locomotor movements of bending, pushing, pulling, stretching, turning, twisting, swinging, swaying, rocking, balancing, and rolling.
  • Balances on a balance beam and on other objects and shows cross-body movement between right arm-left leg and vice versa.
  • Compares and contrasts healthy and unhealthy foods.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of flexibility through warm-up activities and perform exercises that enhance proper flexibility in a variety of muscle groups.
  • Relates scientific understanding of the bones such as bones and muscles to physical activity and health.
  • Enjoys participating in games and activities and recognizes the rules associated with playing.
  • Executes movements in a rhythmic fashion and dances to a beat.
  • Completes a forward roll.

Pre-Kindergarten - Starting at Age 3

 

 

 

Pre-Kindergarten (Pre-K) Curriculum

Our Learning is Fun program introduces your child to the exciting world of learning many new concepts and ideas.

What is the Learning is Fun Program?

https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/736x/6e/9e/3e/6e9e3e2dba55ccaa03db18ea741b7c32--early-education-childhood-education.jpg

It is a play oriented learning experience for your child that teaches  your child that learning new things is fun and exciting. 

What is the main goal of the program?

We want to prepare your child to be able to cooperate with others in a group environment with confidence and self-assurance. Your child will learn to become more independent and able to make choices for herself/himself.

Exploring and Discovering

What teaching methods will we employ?

Small children learn best through play based activities. These activities make learning an easy and fun experience. Playing encourages cooperation, negotiation and sharing.

We have many hands-on teaching aids. “Learning by doing” builds confidence in your child because he/she will  proudly say, “I can do it”!

Reading & Storytelling

Dancing  & Singing

Drawing & Painting

Music & Drama

Playing Outdoors

 

Behavioral & Social skills for three year olds

  • Demonstrates ability the ability to resist the temptation for an immediate reward and wait for a later reward (Delayed Gratification)
  • Establishes Positive Relationships & Friendship with people of all ages
  • Positively participates in a group setting
  • Learns to regulate emotions better
  • Works towards fulfilling expectations
  • Helps clean, tidy a space, and knows where items belong.
  • Engages and is attentive for longer periods of time.
  • Has a sense of self and self-care.
  • Understands capability, worth, and individuality
  • Recognizes personal space & polite behaviors – Learns to not interrupt and recognize private conversations and when someone wishes to be left alone.
  • Learn to socialize and play together with others more constructively
  • Demonstrate responsibility by completing both small and large tasks independently
  • Cooperates in both large group and individual settings

Logic & Reasoning for Preschool

  • Recognizes, recalls, and demonstrates critical thinking and problem solving
  • Makes connections and recognizes similarities
  • Shows creativity and imagination
  • Demonstrates understanding of symbols and representations of a concept

Cognitive & Developmental Goals for three year olds

Arts & Social Sciences

  • Understand basic geographical concepts – Can identify features like hills, mountains, lakes, rivers, ponds, etc. Can also understand spatial awareness like home, city and where they fit on the earth.
  • They know both the people and the environment in which they live and that it may differ in other places.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of diversity – Can identify differences in people, but appreciate the oneness that we are all human and experiences similar emotions.
  • Appreciates music – May dance, sing, hum, or participate in some way while listening to music. Is able to identify basic instruments such as a drum, trumpet, ad piano.
  • Can creatively express themselves – Shows ability to narrate a made-up story whether verbally, with puppets or by some other means.

Language & Literacy Skills

  • Recognize both upper and lower case letters
  • Work on learning letters sounds and pronunciations
  • Recognize their own name in written form
  • Can discriminate rhymes and similar phonemic sounds while reading or speaking.
  • Demonstrates comprehension skills and can answer questions about books after being read.
  • Begins to write their own name and can verbally express first and last name.

Parents Guide for Early Years

Drinking Water & Snacks

The school provides purified drinking water – we encourage students to drink plenty of water.

Each student will bring a snack for our morning break. This is a fun time for the children to sit together and learn more about each others’ food culture and to share with each other. Please make sure you provide snacks that are low in sugar and highly processed foods.

Lunch

We serve healthy lunches based on a three week rotation. We do not serve pork products.  We can cater to those students who have special dietary needs including a vegetarian diet.

See one of our lunch menus below:

School Arrival  and Pick-up

Being on time is important. Classes begin at 8:00 am. The first 1/2 hour of school sets the tone for the day.

You can pick-up your child as follows:

  • at lunch time – just arrange with the office to let us know you plans
  • at any time in the afternoon as per arrangement with the office
  • at the end of the school day – make sure you pick up your child promptly. It causes anxiety for the child and difficult for the teacher when you come late.

Student Journal

The student journal is the link between your child and the school on a daily basis. It provides you with ongoing information and allows the school to communicate with you about items concerning your child. Homework assignments are recorded in the journal.  It is important that you read the journal every day and sign it once you have read it.

Clothing and School Bag

Students are expected to were their uniforms once a week on the designated uniform day. Uniforms will also be worn on school outings. The rest of the time children are free to choose what they will wear. Make sure your child’s clothes are marked for easy identification.

Your child should have a school bag that contains your child’s journal, snack and extra clothes. Please ensure that you have a change of clothes each day – our children are involved in a lot of activities and will sometimes get wet or dirty.

Sports and Swimming Attire

Proper sports attire and shoes should be worn for PE. Skirts are not appropriate for PE. Girls should wear a one piece bathing suit.

The Sun Can Damage Your Child’s Skin

Make sure you provide your child with a good sunscreen. Light skin can burn in as little as 15 minutes. Lets ensure that our young children maintain a healthy skin and prevent melanoma in later years.

Sickness

If your child has the flu or is feverish do not send your child to school. If you suspect your child has contracted an infectious childhood disease please take him/her to the doctor. Let the doctor determine if the child should attend school.

School Families

At U-Can we have school families. Older and younger students are grouped together. The older students help the younger ones at lunch time and on the playground. It is special to watch how the older children look after the little ones.

Early Childhood Education - ECE Ages 3 to 5

ECE Love Dancing

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Developmental Milestones ages 3 to 5. See what child development skills that your child will master between these ages.

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The Key Elements for the

Early Years Teaching Program

We have structured our early childhood education curriculum around four key elements of development to ensure the growth of the whole child.

I’m Sure! Are You Sure?

Social Self Esteem                    

Your child will communicate with others verbally and non-verbally to engage the world around them. Your child will make new friends and gain the confidence, self-esteem, and negotiating skills necessary for a lifetime of healthy relationships. Your child will learn to feel good about who he/she is and establish a  strong self identity.

Dancing with Confidence!

Emotional Security

Children will enjoy a safe, nurturing “home away from home” where they can learn to express themselves and understand their own unique identities. Your child will gain the comfort and confidence to forge trusting relationships, value their individuality, and have fun just being himself.

Fun Day at Botanical Gardens

Physical Well-Being

We focus on the physical health and well-being of your child so he grows up safe and strong. Motor-skill development, coordination, mobility, and exercise all help ensure your growing child has a healthy body for a lifetime.

Learning the Art of Story Telling

Intellectual Growth

Our early education programs help build brain   power by supporting the development of judgment, perception, memory, reasoning, critical thinking, and  language through a series of age-appropriate cognitive activities. Reading, writing, and math are important and children learn by experiencing the world around them.

Your Questions Answered

 

 

Your Important Questions

Early Years Program = Ages 3 to 5

1.What is the philosophy behind the Early Childhood Education Program at  U-Can International?

   We believe that your child deserves a great introduction to the exciting world of learning. We will ensure that your child will participate in a well-rounded program that will prepare him/her for a happy lifelong learning experience.

  1. What are the levels in the Early Childhood Education Program?

   – Pre-Kindergarten Age 3+

   – Kindergarten Age 4+

   – Foundations Age 5+ – Preparation for Grade 1

     (full details for each level in the curriculum tabs)

  1. What are the keys areas of focus for the Early Years?

   We seek to the develop the whole child – social, emotional, intellectual & physical for a well-rounded individual.

  1. What is the most important thing that your child should come to understand during their Early Years?

   “That learning is fun”. When children enjoy learning then school becomes something to look forward to and be excited about.  When children enjoy the learning experience their minds are open and inquisitive. Learning becomes easy.

Starting the Morning Well Makes the Whole Day Better

Packing Your Child’s Morning Snack

Being at school is hard work, so by mid-morning your child will be hungry and thirsty. They will need a nutritious light snack and drink.

 

 

When packing your child’s snack:

  • provide healthy food and drink in realistic quantities for a snack
  • ensure that your child can open and unwrap their lunch — plastic film wrap can be very difficult for little fingers
  • provide a variety of smaller items rather than one or two large items
  • check with the school for information about healthy food and drink choices
  • provide a water bottle every day and encourage your child to drink from it
  • keep sweets, chips and other party food for parties or special occasions.

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Getting You Child Ready for School

Starting school can be an exciting but stressful time for you and your child. For some children it may be the first time that they have been away from their parents. They may be going into a strange environment with unfamiliar people and things around them.

There are some simple steps you can take to help make your child’s time at school more enjoyable and relaxed.

Encourage your child to be independent by helping them get used to:

  • putting on and doing up his or her shoes
  • eating and drinking without help (opening lunchboxes, wrapping and unwrapping school lunches and drinking from drink bottles)
  • caring for and putting away play things
  • using a handkerchief or tissue
  • going to the toilet independently
  • using playground equipment safely
  • carrying his or her own bag
  • identifying his or her own belongings

Communication is the Key

Work with your child to develop his or her communication skills. Help your child to:

  • make his or her own needs known
  • use appropriate greetings
  • smile and be friendly
  • respond verbally when spoken to

Some Things You Can do to Prepare for the First Day of School

As a parent, you play a vital role in your child’s education

By getting involved in the school you can help your child make a smooth and happy start to their education.You can do this by:

  • introducing yourself to your child’s teacher
  • sharing information with your child’s teacher
  • talking with your child about their day
  • daily checking the student journal
  • Learning the songs and rhymes your child shares with you
  • checking the school website for news and information
  • attending family fun days
  • volunteering to attend school excursions or participate in classroom activities

Things You Can Do at Home

  • Play card games and board games with your child. This helps to develop mathematical, problem-solving, language and social skills such as turn-taking and not always winning.
  • Spend time together as a family — activities such as shopping, going to the park or working in the garden build children’s awareness and knowledge of the world around them as well as develop language skills.
  • Find opportunities to write with your child. This includes making lists for grocery shopping or things to take on trips and writing letters. These opportunities build children’s awareness of vocabulary and the importance of reading and writing.
  • Sing familiar songs and nursery rhymes together with your child.
  • Show respect for your child’s natural curiosity. Be patient and try to find the time to answer the many questions they ask or make ways to find answers together.
  • Help your child become responsible by encouraging him or her to pass on school notices and newsletters or to pack his or her school bag each day.

“The first day of school is scary – for you and your child.”

Making the First Day of School a Success

There are some simple steps you can take to make your child’s first day at school more enjoyable and relaxed. Be prepared. The best thing you can do is to make the first day as stress-free and relaxed as possible.

The day before write a list of all you’ll need to organize, such as food and a change of clothing. Stick the list to the fridge and tick each item off with your child as you complete it. On the day:

  • leave plenty of time to get ready
  • make a nutritious breakfast — this is essential for sustained energy and concentration
  • talk through the daily routine — start, lunch and finish times
  • talk through a few simple self-help ideas — for example, asking teachers for help or directions
  • be positive and encouraging about your child’s attendance at school
  • be flexible in the early days of school, children may take a little while to settle in

Familiarize your child with the school environment and routine by:

  • driving or walking by the school a few times so that the school becomes a familiar place
  • attending an orientation program or open day so you can meet your child’s teacher and see the classroom
  • showing your child where to put his or her things, such as a school bag and hat
  • making sure your child knows how they will get home from school
  • getting your child a special bag for school where he/she can bring a snack, school materials and other needed items.
  • checking with child’s teacher to see what can be done to make a smooth transition.
  • encourage children to understand that teachers are at school to help.
  • let the child know that you know exactly where they are and what is happening at the school – be sure to spend time at home talking about the school experience.